Clarke Galusha

Reflection

 

MAIN GALLERY
Clarke Galusha – Reflection

 

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS GALLERY

Brooks Dierdorff & Robert Beam

 

November 2nd through December 2nd  2012

Opening Reception: Friday, November 2nd 6-9pm

 

Newspace Center for Photography is pleased to announce an exhibition of tintype photographs by Clarke Galusha.  Clarke was selected for a solo exhibition from our 2011 Juried Exhibition by juror Raymond Meeks. Our Special Exhibitions gallery will feature work by Brooks Dierdorff and Robert Beam, two photographers who reside in Eugene, Oregon.

Clarke Galusha was born in New York City but raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Growing up, he was inspired by his older brother, a prolific artist and painter.  It was his brother who first introduced Clarke to photography when he was a teenager.  Clarke fell in love with the medium and went on to earn a BFA in photography at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana in 2003. While earning his BFA, Clarke assisted photographer Deborah Luster with her “One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana” project.

Following the untimely death of his brother in 2003, Clarke put down his camera and spent the next seven years working as a mental health counselor.  It wasn’t until the birth of his son in 2010 that Clarke was inspired to pursue photography again.

The photographs in this exhibition were made using the wet-plate collodion process to create tintype portraits. These tintypes are hand made and individually exposed, creating a one of a kind object.

“The tintype portrait is a reflection of what we see – a mirror image. The materials make the image darker and richer, creating a dense reflection of a moment in time. I was intrigued by the idea of engaging children in this project. I believed that children would be genuine, not yet self-conscious about their appearance in photographs. Because the tintype process captures so well a still, calm moment in time, I found that the intelligence and complexity of a child seemed to reveal themselves in these portraits. I tried not to pose, suggest, or intervene in their presentation. The children were not asked to smile but were just encouraged to relax and look at the camera. What seems to come through in each portrait is the genuine, adorable, and complex character of each individual child: a true reflection of themselves.”

[Artist Website]

 

Brooks Dierdorff’s series of images titled, “Sequence,” employs the scanner as an image -making device. His work challenges the technical and conceptual boundaries of photography by taking photographic norms and the representational field itself as the subject.

Brooks has exhibited his work both nationally and internationally at galleries that include the Ulrike Hamm gallery in Bissendorf, Germany, the Salander O’Rielly gallery in New York, and Disjecta in Portland. Currently, Brooks is a co-director of Ditch Projects, an artist-run exhibition space in Springfield, Oregon. Brooks received his BA from the University of California, San Diego in 2007 and his MFA from the University of Oregon in 2012.

 [Artist Website]

 

Robert Beam’s practice is dependent on what isn’t obtainable or present through consideration of the atmosphere, perception rather than subject, and what can be mined from the structures that govern photography. The photograph acts as a recurring object of this pursuit, never representing what it was or how it is now. The results create an open and visual method of realizing what is present and revealing to the viewer an act of seeing. Robert does not wish for the viewing of the work to be about an event, rather for the viewing to be the event.

Currently expanding on multiple bodies of work, Robert’s observations concern the relationships between landscape, history, material, and the various methods of vision. Through exploring and creating a physical connections between objects, time, and natural phenomena he hopes to create a visual account of the power these qualities have and ways in which they characterize and form the viewers ideas of perception.

Robert is a current MFA candidate at the University of Oregon in his last year.

[Artist Website]